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Schedule Your Mpox Vaccine

Martha's Vineyard Hospital has partnered with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to host a Mpox (formerly known as monkeypox) Vaccine Clinic on the second Monday of each month from 4 pm - 6 pm beginning in January 2023.

Resource

Schedule Your Mpox Vaccine

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health will be on site the second Monday of every month from 4 pm – 6 pm to administer mpox vaccines.

Appointments can be scheduled in advance using the button below and walk-ups are also welcome.

About the Mpox Vaccine

The mpox vaccine, JYNNEOS (also known as Imvamune or Imvanex), is available to people who live or work in Massachusetts and meet the current eligibility criteria.

There is currently a limited supply of JYNNEOS. Vaccination is prioritized for individuals at the highest risk of exposure to someone with mpox.

Who Should Get Vaccinated?

In the current outbreak, you may want to get vaccinated if:

  • You have been identified as a close contact of someone with mpox.
  • You learn that one of your sex partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with mpox.

In addition, you may want to get vaccinated if you are a man who has sex with other men or are a transgender or gender-diverse person who has sex with men and in the past 2 weeks:

  • You have had sex with multiple partners or group sex.
  • You have had sex at a commercial sex venue (like a sex club or bathhouse).
  • You have had sex at an event, venue, or in an area where mpox transmission is occurring.

Keep in mind that:

  • Getting vaccinated as soon as possible after exposure to someone with mpox (ideally within 4 days) provides the best chance to prevent the disease or make it less severe.
  • Currently, CDC is not encouraging vaccination against mpox for the broader public or for everyone who is sexually active.
  • While vaccine supplies are limited, getting a mpox vaccine when you don’t need it could mean that people who do need it can’t get it.
  • If you need help deciding whether you should get vaccinated, talk to a healthcare provider, or contact your local health department. They can help you determine if you should get vaccinated.
  • In addition to getting vaccinated, there are other things you can do to prevent mpox.

*Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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